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with paul krugman is ahead. why he says the deficit doesn't matter now and why the government needs to spend more money. he ran two of the most important companies and turned around general motors. i will talk les sobs learned, the state of the american future. and baubles and bling. if you have the cash they have the jewels. if perfect valentine's gift for deep pockets. jewels anyone? >> co oh co always wore two. >> "on the money" begins now. >> announcer: this is america's number one financial news program. "on the money." now, mario bartiromo. >> here's a look at the news as we head into a new week on the money. it is the u.s. government versus standard & poor's. the most aggressive move yet to hold accountable a company at the center of the financial melt down of 2008. the $5 billion civil suit charges s&p intended to defraud investors by giving securities created from subprime loans aaa ratings they didn't deserve. the attorney says not so fast. >> the government has to show in this case not that a lot of people lost money because of the investments. government has to show the s&p liter
? >> i think it will be unnecessary. we already cut $2 billion from the deficit. the president is serious enough about his desire to close the deal that he's been willing to keep his offer to speaker boehner on the table. so i think if we could come together and compromise, we could get the rest of the way there and stabilizing our debt, bringing our deficits way below 3% of gdp. and i think it would be unfortunate for anyone at this point to start saying that they should take an absolutist position. they can't have a penny of reven revenue. $800 billion in expenditures and loopholes that could be used to reduce the deficit. how can it be now there's not one penny? that you have to do it all in medicare, education, medicaid, but you can't find one penny of a loophole, tax expenditure even for the most well off american that could be part of a deficit reduction package. >> couldn't the other side have said that to you back in january when they actually raised taxes but they got -- they didn't get revenue? i'm sorry. they didn't get any cuts? so it's the same thing, right? because the repub
, and in terms of the sequester, i agree with the last guest. in many ways between the fed and the deficit spending on the deficit level, even though it's going to be smaller this year, it's hard to beat, that so i think the sequester, where we really demonstrate that the growth in many ways is paid for because when you stop it's going to take away jobs, those kind of black reality swans will be the issue for the market ahead. >> brian gendron, where are you on this and how do you want to be invested? >> we don't think this rally is over entirely. if you extrapolate a 5% or 6% return we've had so far this year, we'll have one of the greatest stock markets of all time in the face of, you know, good earnings but not great earnings, in the face of still slow growth. i think that's a little unrealistic so we'll probably get a little bit of a pullback, unusual if we didn't. still recommending a substantial allocation to equities. this year looks like last year, political uncertainty. last year was a good year for stocks. as for stocks versus bonds, i've been thinking it was the end of a 30-year
office, assumes no change in current laws, 2013 fiscal year budget deficit, $845 billion. cbo projects first time below $1 trillion since 2008, 5% of gdp, well below the peak of 2009. saying deficits decline as a percentage of gdp could dip as low as 2.4% in 2015. then they start to rise again in 2016. that 10-year-old cbo deficit projection increased overall to 4.6 trillion for the 2013 decade up from $20.2 trillion in it's previous. cbo sees real gdp growing 1.4% in 2013, the sub died growth limits businesses to hire more workers, cbo projecting unemployment rate to stay near 8% this year, also expecting unemployment rate to remain above 7.5% through 2014. debt and deficits will be larger, the cbo says, if current laws were modified and rising health care cost and increased federal health care subsidies, spending cuts and higher taxes with offset deficit increases long-term says the cbo. over and over again this report talks about those short-term budget decisions on the horizon including march 1st, the automatic spending reductions, sequester. what does congress and the white house
joins us thousanow all the details. >> as you know, there are two ways to go about deficit reduction under the sequester law passed in 2011. one is the full ten year sequester. that's $1.2 trillion in budget cuts over ten years. the other is to do it piece meal. if do you it just for the rest of of the year, it would just be $85 billion. president obama said if congress can't agree with the full pack annual by march 1st, we need to do something smaller in the name of staving off damage to the economy, to consumer, and to federal workers. here's the president. >> if congress can't act immediately on a bigger package, about they can't get a bigger package done by the time the sequester is scheduled fto go into effect, then i believe they should at least pass a smaller package of spending cuts and tax reforms that would delay the economically damaging effects of the sequester for a few more months until congress finds a way to replace these cuts with a smarter solution. >> now, of course the fundamental barriers separating the two sides on either a short term or long term deal is that p
tax revenues in order to help the deficit. we'll have a conversation with represent dave camp coming up later in the program. stay with us. m charles schwab... tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 gives me tools that help me find opportunities more easily. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i can even access it from the cloud and trade on any computer. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and with schwab mobile, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i can focus on trading anyplace, anytime. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 until i choose to focus on something else. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 all this with no trade minimums. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and only $8.95 a trade. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 open an account with a $50,000 deposit, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and get 6 months commission-free trades. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 call 1-866-294-5411. more "likes." more tweets. so, beginning today, my son brock and his whole team will be our new senior social media strategists. any questions? since we make radiator valves wouldn't it be better if we just let fedex help us to expand to new markets? hmm gotta admit that's better than a few "likes." i don't have the door code. who's that
await final action on deficit reductions. well, the best way to reduce deficits is through economic growth. [ applause ] get ready for a lot more of that new-plane smell. we're building the youngest, most modern fleet among the largest us airlines to ensure that you are more comfortable and connected than ever. we are becoming a new american. barrow island has got rare kangaroos. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> welcome back to "the kudlow report." in this half hour, mahmoud ahmadinejad says iran is now a nuclear country. does that mean the rogue regime already has nuclear weapons? we'll get an answer later on. on what would have been president reagan's 102nd birthday, we will honor reagan with a look at many of his messages that resonate today. we have more of his best comments for you and we have reagan biographer cr
've taken. they've taken three quarters of the potential revenue for deficit balancing off the table. >> they is? >> congress. >> or are we saying the democrats, the president? >> everybody. this is what they all agreed to, right? so that's problem number one. problem number two is on the spending side, now are we going to make serious cuts or not? i don't think they are unless we go over the cliff. there's not going to be any opportunity to cut pentagon spending in any serious way if you don't go over the cliff. so there is some stuff in there that i as a democrat don't like. but i think everybody's going to put something in the pot in order to balance the deficit. we did a lousy job in january on the tax side and i hope that -- i think it's better to go over the cliff than do a lousy job -- >> how many people do you know on your side of the field who actually agree with you? >> very few. look they're politicians. they want to spend as much money as they possibly can and they don't want to pay for it. >> who agrees with you? >> oh, i don't know. i bet -- oh, god, joe agrees with me.
instead of really dealing with the banks and dealing with the regional deficit overhang, he just created a circle of loop of help. so the government has been giving money to the regions, the banks to the regions and the government to the banks. but there's no real solution. the problems we main in spain. >> well, this is interesting. so, actually, michael brown was just talking about europe being somewhat of a closed economy. what you're talking about here in spain is this closed loop between the money that is getting in and borrowing. explain a little bit about this crazy looking chart here, flow chart, we should say, and this point that what happens in spain is staying in spain. >> this is a simplified chart of what has been going on. all the rectangular things are off balance. fade is the fund for utility financing. they're funded by the government. rajoy on the 31st of december increased the limit of these funds. frob and the bad bank are funding the banking system, the weak banks, including bankia. and the ffpp is a fund where banks have lent 30 billion to the region. on top of this
the deficit automatically picks up because there's slow revenue coming in and there's the need to spend on programs to help ease us through a slow period. it was wise policy, wise policy. >> bob, what do you think? >> well, i agree with laura that a better policy would be to put these cuts into entitlement reform and have them occur over time rather than immediately and abruptly, but it doesn't seem like the other side it s willing to engage in discussion of entitlement reform right now, so maybe we need to go ahead and do what we have to do and then keep the negotiations open. >> is that the issue then, laura? since we can't come to a deal when the republicans feel like they have leverage, they have got to do it when they can do it? >> i honestly don't think so. we have elections coming up in two years. i've heard republican members of the hill saying that this is what the public wants, the public wants a sequester. the public doesn't want a sequester. when the public realizes what a sequester means for jobs in their community, for education programs in their community, for the fact th
deficit. and we can do it in a gradual way. >> so what does smart spending cuts mean? judd gregg is co-chair of the fix the debt campaign. robert reich is from the university of california at berkeley and author of "beyond outrage." both are cnbc contributors and we thank you for joining us. good to see you both. senator gregg, what's a smart spending cut? what's that mean? >> i don't know. i think it's a washington speak word for probably no cuts. >> no cuts? >> that's the tradition in washington. they say if it's not a good cut, don't make the cut. the fact is there's going to have to be decisions made here. taxes were raised at the end of the year. and we know we can't get to the fiscal responsibility we need without our entitlement accounts. they'll vo to step up. >> do you think we will actually see spending cuts on the entitlements? >> what i think is going to happen here is you're going to e see the sequester. it's going to go forward. the pressure is going to be so strong from groups that benefit from those accounts there will be a coming together to relieve that pressure and m
more deficit reduction is planned if it occurs or cuts equivalent to the size of it $1.2 trillion over ten years. you will have had three trillion done or in the pipeline and simpson bowles two years ago called for it. although if they were sitting here today they would probably call for a higher number. it is not being done in the right way. in a balanced way and the key to spending restraint entitlement reform is not part of the picture. >> and allen your book. let's talk about that, after the music stops, you ar fewed that the tarp and the stimulus did their jobs why and what did we learn? >> why? we had a sick banking system. that had to be the first order of priority even though it was boend to be unpopular politically and still is. you ask them and they sort of twist their heads into awful shapes and say why didn't the government ever do it. because if that went down all of us went down with it. it was going to go down as a successful government policy. as will the unknown piece. which is the government stress test which put the green light back on the system. some of them have t
numbers like the better than expected trade balance which saw deficits shrinkage of about, what, close to 21%. all of these december numbers are going to impact potential revisions to gdp for the fourth quarter, which we received last week. and it was a paltry minus .1 of 1%. we'll watch this number very carefully. interest rates have moved up with stocks. wholesale inventories shrank .1 of 1%. sales were unchanged at a goose egg. we were expecting .4 on inventories. this is going to be very key as we factor in some of our potential revisions for the next look at fourth quarter gdp, which comes at the end of the month. here we get close, within two basis points of 2%. remember, we started out around 193, 194 today and closed last week at the highest yield close going back to april at 2.02. >> rick santelli, thank you. not too much reaction in terms of the major averages to that data. it is important to keep in mind, with these gains here, we're now positive for the week. definitely for the s&p 500. this is a new high, by the way, on the spx. up almost eight points. the nasdaq as you se
is turning to for advice on everything from the deficit to taxes to the broader economy. >>> then, after we talk to them, they're going to paint a picture for us, we're going to turn to two powerful investors for insight into what the conversation in washington means for the broader markets. cowen and company ceo jeff solomon will join us, and the bond king, bill gross. first, steve will bring us up to speed on the morning's top stories. steve? >> thank you, michelle. disney posting better than expected earnings and revenues after the bell. the company says it expects the next few quarters to be better on a stronger lineup of films and growing attendance at its theme parks. ceo bob iegory was on cnbc's "closing bell." >> you had a lot of ins and outs. basically, the trendser good. we had strong results at our domestic parks. the bookings have been pretty solid. advertising was okay. and generally speaking, our business performed well. and our interactive media group was profitable for the quarter. that's the first time the group has been profitable since we've been breaking it out. >> share
deficits, and that austerity was never given a credible grade, for example, by many investors, thinking, of course, it wasn't a great strategy. i concur. here's the problem, though. you know, austerity by definition is, you know, deficit cutting with less benefits and services. now, it is a horrible word. and, of course, many governments and politicians grabbed on to it because they really don't want deficit cutting and they don't want less benefits and services. but it is pretty hard to call it austerity as we go into, what, year six of post credit crisis activity. and global economics don't dictate we're doing a heck of a lot better, even though we had some jumps in growth, which kind of can be predicated on high levels of stimulus, maybe don't call it stimulus, maybe you call it just three to four years of big deficits. now, quid pro quo on the other hand seems to be the relationship that dictates who the big buyers are of very high quality, relatively speaking sovereign debt, whether it is boons, treasuries, guilts or ooth oaths. we need a whole lot less quid and a lot more pro grow
position they'll be in. of course they're being conservative. the deficit problem is the problem for later in this decade. the jobs problem is the problem today. and this talk of a contracti contractionary fiscal position. it is hurting the economy. >> he wantive harris? >> in the end, we've got to get our deficit under control while we grow the private sector economy. we can't do it through new taxation. you can't tax your way out of this mess. that's the problem. the president has decided that's the approach he's going to take. the republicans have a different approach. we believe we have to rein in entitlement spending, the budgets up until now. again across the aisle and on the other side, they're unwilling to handle. >> we'll leave it there. thank you. >> let you both get back to work. thanks for joining us. >> thank you. >> appreciate your time. thanks very much. isn't it nice to know in two weeks you haven't missed anything? >> this sounds familiar. >> 40 minutes before the closing bell sounds. dow down 103 points. >>> google getting downgraded after a record high on friday when we
there's no major catalysts in the market. we got that trade deficit number narrowest in three years. >> good numbers from china. >> if we can believe them. i don't know. depends how you feel about the numbers. still the numbers were there. that was some after what the market was chewing on today. but a low volume day. >> a lot of talk about apple. we're going go after apple in a second. everyone is talking about apple and its excess cash and what's going to happen and this lawsuit from mine einhorn. >> $137 billion dollar of excess cash. that's a lot of cash. should they be returning it to shareholders? einhorn says give it back to us in the form of preferred shares. he's filed this lawsuit. i think it's interesting really that apple even responded. so often you don't heart company say anything when all of this buzz is going around. i don't know what are going to do. i don't know what the right thing is to do. but i know they should make the shareholders feel like it's worth holding that stock. >> i think there's going to be a lot of movement on that. many thanks to cnbc's courtney
and deficit. to put a plan in place. it's not just because we want to send a signal to the markets that washington's getting its act together. that's true. and that's a good result. but, it really is to help people. we don't want to see interest rates go up and the need for higher taxes. we don't want to see burden laid on the families, and individuals just coming out of school or seniors. we're trying to put us on a path to a growing economy, where there's more opportunity. >> but eric, you're still in a position of trying to sugarcoat a position of telling people that they are going to be getting less. that you're not going to make the same loans available, that this is a -- this is something that the president campaigned on very successfully. it's that situation. it's the immigration situation. are these different positions or this is just a new way of saying the same thing? >> look. what we're saying is our policies are the best path forward to help people in their lives. and the conservative principles of not spending money you don't have, of making sure that you put in place
of that cycle? with some of the problems that we're facing right now with the deficit issues, with the entitlement issues that are coming up, how do we get politicians to start talking about some of those tough realities? >> i don't know. the ones that do get slaughtered. i don't know how we do it. i wish i were that smart. >> do you think it's holding back business at this point? or does business operate kind of outside the sphere of what's happening in washington. >> oh, you can't operate outside the sphere. the last few years, where anybody in a corporation was considered evil, and i really felt that way. i know my colleagues felt that way, you have to operate in spite of washington. and because, first of all, you have a responsibility, shareholders employees customers, whatever, but you're a business. and you're there to run a business, and to make good products and get profit, and la, la, la, everybody's happy. so you have to do it even with the weight of washington strapped to your back every day. >> you said that you felt the last two years that businesses and your col
's going to seek to get new revenue to help bring down the deficit and specifically, he's now calling out carried interest tax breaks again. we'll see where that goes. plus, the story that everyone is talking about this morning, the ravens holding on to beat the 49ers in the super bowl after the lights went out for 45 minutes at the superdome. we're going to try to keep the lights on. "squawk box" begins right now. ♪ if you like it then you should have put a ring on it ♪ ♪ if you like it then you should have put a ring on it ♪ >> good morning, everybody. i'm becky quick along with andrew ross sorkin. joe kernen is on vacation today so we're joined by steve liesman. we're happy to have him here. our top story this morning, the market. we have assembled a trio of wall street's most respected voices to join us for the next hour. we have a lot to talk about this morning. plus, there is that issue of the lights going out at the super dole last night. officials say an abnormality in the power system triggered an automatic shutdown forcing backup systems to kick in. but they weren't sure
closing their budget deficit overnight really with tax -- big tax rise that governor brown got through. gold is the fear trade and look how quickly that has abated here in california. that potentially is a mantra for the country, and if people think the fear trade is gone. where are they going to go, equities and 14,000 may just be the beginning. that's what i see. >> that's right. >> the gold rush is over in california, again. >> thanks, everybody. we'll see you soon. appreciate your time. we are watching dow 14,000 going into the close tonight. josh lipton is right now looking at the stocks leading the comeback. over to you, josh. >> maria, big gains today following yesterday's selloff and lots of new highs starting with the dow transports, hitting a new all-time high year-to-date. the transports have outpaced the dow industrials by over 4%. all driving the rally, information technology stocks, computer sciences. the biggest gainer in the sector and on the s&p 500 today, up around 10%, a turnaround story, the i.t. company posting a third quarter profit on improving revenues and asset
you. >>> when thele toings who are responsible for solving our debt deficit issues are the same ones against cost-cutting at the post office, it means we're in pretty deep trouble. we'll talk about it next. stay with us. ak. surgery was successful, but he will be in a cast until it is fully healed, possibly several months. so, if the duck isn't able to work, how will he pay for his living expenses? aflac. like his rent and car payments? aflac. what about gas and groceries? aflac. cell phone? aflac, but i doubt he'll be using his phone for quite a while cause like i said, he has a fractured beak. [ male announcer ] send the aflac duck a get-well card at getwellduck.com. riding the dog like it's a small horse is frowned upon in this establishment! luckily though, ya know, i conceal this bad boy underneath my blanket just so i can get on e-trade. check my investment portfolio, research stocks... wait, why are you taking... oh, i see...solitary. just a man and his thoughts. and a smartphone... with an e-trade app. ♪ nobody knows... [ male announcer ] e-trade. investing unleashed. >>> a
had the south african mine strikes which really put deficits there relative to the demand that's there. that put platinum and both palladium as well. >> sean, thanks. carl, thank you, as well. >> okay. coming up, folks. details on some looming job cuts on wall street. and we're also building up to the newsmakers of the morning. former treasury secretary robert rubin, in studio. that's a cnbc exclusive, folks, at 8:00 eastern. plus, chicago fed president charlie evans talking about the central bank's next move. do stay tuned. >>> tomorrow, a special edition of "squawk box." live from pebble beach. former yahoo! ceo carol bartz will be our guest host. we'll talk to at&t chairman and ceo randall stevenson. plus, the legendary clint eastwood. >> people have to get creative when the pressure is on. >> it all starts tomorrow at 6:00 a.m. eastern. >>> welcome back to "squawk." barclays capital saying it plans to lay off 275 employees at three offices in new york. it's blaming economic factors for the layoffs. the layoffs are going to take place during a 14-day period beginning may 5th. how do
for a bigger deal to address the debt and the deficit. >> a lot to talk about with our next guest. reaction from capitol hill from kentucky republican senator rand paul. we welcome you, snofrenator. do you think we'll get a deal on the sequestration issue before march 1st? >> you know, all these people carping about sequestration being harmful to the economy. that would presume that the government creates wealth by spending money. i think that's a ridiculous keynesian notion that's been disproved for the last 40 years. so i think cutting spending is precisely what you should do to spur the economy. when money comes to washington and it's spent, that's how it's disruptive and spent inefficiently. let's leave that money in the marketplace. >> are you saying you want to see the sequester happen? >> the sequester barely cuts any icing off the top of the cake. spending is going to rise $9 trillion over the next ten years. the sequester takes 1 trillion off of that. spending still goes up $8 trillion over the next ten years. that's why bowles/simpson said we need 4 trillion and why people like me
the same notion, why item doing the rick santelli in this light. whether tax or deficits, it seems as though james stewart needs to go to a lot of different media and explain the herd mentality. just look at debt and deficits, i am not picking on the "new york times." we know the "new york times" for the most side will side with the progressive liberals and other papers go the other way. the point is in five, 10 years the deficits completely blow up, as mr. stewart point out since nobody went the other way, there's safety in numbers. when it all goes down the tube, my gosh, what a surprise. get everybody that covers politics to kick the tire. consider they may not know the outcome as intensely and as positively as those analysts that you depicted on apple. it just amazes me he is so correct on apple but many reporters that cover politics are so blinded by the notion that they're speeding down a highway and they have no idea there may be cars going the other way. back to you. >> rick santelli, thank you. apple is reportedly experimenting with wristwatches that have the function of a
. trade and balance was better than expected. we have been running a deficit for years, as you know, sue. but this time it is narrower than anticipated. remember it was negative. 0.1. a positive print on gdp likely when the revision comes in. you see the big pop there this morning? that's because of the trade numbers overall. so good numbers, good day overall. don't worry about volume and we are staying until the bitter end, sue? >> indeed you are, bob. appreciate it. meanwhile, big snowstorm is bearing down on the northeast nap is sending fuel prices to new highs for 2013. sharon epperson tracks the action for us at the nyse pits. hi, sharon. >> hi. already paying the highest gasoline prices for this time of year, now many in the northeast who heat homes with heating oil will be hit with record high home heating bills as well. we are looking at prices just this week alone for heating oil few furs surge 3% leading energy markets higher here and we are continuing to watch what is happening in terms of the percentage of homes in the northeast that use heating oil. of course it is only 6% o
the spanish deficit and perhaps more difficult for him to ask for insensitive measures to stimulate the economy at the european level. there's a trend on twitter tweeting for the -- the contractions for rajoy reject and that's on the right very well the situation here in spain. since the case, the corruption case was reported by the newspaper a few days ago. rajoy lost six points in the opinion polls in approval ratings. he is now amid 24%. that being said, the leader, the socialist leader of the opposition remains in terms of rating. so even if there's a lot of pressure on rajoy, there's now not any alternative in shape. that's the reason why the worry in the market. that's the reason for the decline today on the ibex 35. >> stephane, thanks for that. the bond, is it driven by political uncertainty, of course, but the pmi is up this morning for spain, up 47. but the employment pmi, down to 42 and that's back from the low since this time last year. >> i don't like the numbers. if you'd asked me six months ago, i would have probably said possibility of spanish growth falling off the
's a little schizophrenia going on. a lot of folks think we need to cut and solve the deficit and now when we face cuts and face austerity, it's very difficult. the bottom line is that because of the divided government, it's very difficult for there to be a global solution that would, you know, make a lot of rationale sense. and, instead, we're facing a series of cuts like the sequester that although they look disorganized are slowly getting us towards a more balanced budget. i think the markets have pretty much digested the fact that the sequester is likely. i doubt that it will have a significant impact on the markets because i think everybody already knows it's likely to happen. >> this goes back, again, to one of your concerns. certainly a concern for a lot of people in the u.s., which is where is the middle any more inspect and it's interesting because in your career you've switched parties. explain that move. are there going to be any more like you? >> well, you know, i used to be a moderate republican and now it's a moderate democrat. but the truth is, there aren't very many moderates
deficit figures are due out at 8:30 a.m. eastern. the gap is expected to narrow to about $45 billion. then, 10:00, december wholesale trade. the usda's crop report is out at 12:00 insurance. and we're get earnings from cboe, entergy, moody's and aol. >>> eu leaders could see the first real term cut in the history of the region's budget. jewel yeah is in brussels for us and joins us now. jewels, they had an all-night meeting and this has been portrayed as a potential victory for david cameron. is that how it's going to play out? >> if we end up with a real term cut in its budget, it's arguably a real term budget. i think he's going to have a tough time coming back to the uk and explaining that on monday if this is actually what we get. we're expecting the talks to resume in just under an hour's time and they're hoping to have a final proposal at that stage and things could move quite quickly. we live in hope. what we have heard earlier is that the rumors that italy are happy, so that would fit with this suggestion. but, you know, i know you were making the point earlier that this is a symbo
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